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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the deal creating the world's largest airline became official today. american airlines emerged from bankruptcy to join with u.s. airways. the new carrier will operate under the american airlines name. the merger leaves four airlines controlling more than 80% of the american travel market. passengers won't see immediate changes to reservations or frequent flyer programs, and it remains unclear if the deal will mean higher fares. eight of the most prominent u.s. tech companies, including apple, google and facebook, are calling for tighter controls on government surveillance. they sent an open letter to president obama today, in the wake of revelationshat the go
and science. what changes need to be made to ensure future generations can compete in a global economy? we have that and more tonight on "nightly business report" for this tuesday, december 3rd. >>> good evening everyone and welcome. i'm tyler mathisen. remember how great the month november was for stock investors, records and consecutive weeks of gains? hold that thought because so far december has gone the other way. fast. in fact, the dow and s&p 500 today ended lower for a third straight session. logging their biggest three-day decline in two months. some on wall street say stock prices are too high and they are taking profits and there is a pull back and this is the start of it, or maybe consumer spending, soggy so far this holiday season or the fed's seeing the blowout auto sales? we'll start pairing back on stimulus soon. whatever the reason the market sold off again today. the dow ending well off the lows of the session, however, nevertheless down 94 points and closing below 16,000, as you see there. the nasdaq was down eight and the s&p 500 lost five dipping back below the 1800 ma
and compare performances in reading, math and science. results from 2012 were released today, and, once again, the u.s. hovered near the middle of the pack, lagging in some areas even as other countries advanced. math remains the biggest challenge. 29 other systems had higher average scores than american high schoolers. the u.s. fared better in reading, where it ranked 20th, and in science, ranking 23rd. the best results were in east asia, where students from shanghai, singapore, south korea and japan, among others, placed near the top. pisa results also showed another concern for american teens as well: a smaller percentage of them reached the top levels of proficiency. as in the past, though, some education experts questioned just what and how much pisa tells us, given social, cultural and economic differences among nations. the pisa test is coordinated by the organization for economic cooperation and development, the o.e.c.d. andreas schleicher serves as deputy director for education and skills there. he helped develop and runs the tests, and joins us now. >> so explain to us first, what i
. that would include things like infrastructure, education, r&d. >> rose: science exploration. >> rose: and we spent about 30% on transfer payments to the elderly. >> we now spend 68% on transfer payments but investments are down to 15%. so i think to larry's point, what did we get out of the investment? well, we got the internet. we got g.p.s., we got the human genome. >> rose: so that's where you agree with him. >> i totally agree. and if you look at the sequester -- >> rose: that the investments are worthwhile and important and crucial to our future. >> yes, but we are cutting the investments so we can continue to let transfer payments to the elderly grow at a very rapid rate. we cannot do both. >> rose: or we're cutting the investments because we do not have a realistic look at where taxes-- which you're prepared to have a real itselfic look at. yes? in other words, you're not coming here as a representative a view often expressed by the 30 members of congress, although you had reservations about the health fund, defunding the health care even though you expressed riz reservations about it
breakthroughs in science straight from leading research centers with wisdom from the ages. >> knowing what you're really hungry for is the key to losing weight, enjoying more vitality and feeling more joy. >> announcer: join dr. deepak chopra and learn how to permanently lose weight, gain emotional well-being, and reduce the risks of dreaded
of all, change. >> engineering doesn't have to be this incredibly intimidating math science thing. we can show girls engineering changes people's lives and it can help make the world a better place. >> sterling says goldie blocks is making money but not ready to say how much and it's one of four finalist for a contest to win a free super bowl commercial worth close to $4 million. that announcement is due in late january. we'll fill you in when we get it. >> play with the dolls and become an engineer and do great things for the country. >> absolutely. >> we can use more women like that. >> that's "nightly business report" for tonight. we want to remind you, this is the time of year your public television needs your support to make shows like this possible. >> i'm tyler mathisen. thanks for your support. have a great weekend, everybody. see you back here on monday. >>> night by business report has been brought to you in part by. >> thestreet.com, up to the minute stock market news and in depth analysis. our quant rating service prov e provides objective independent ratings daily on over 43
's not true in europe. >> rose: and falling behind in scores on math and science and engineering! >> rose: >> and also 25 years ago if you were a dropout you could work a lathe or a press, there were lots of jobs. you didn't even have to speak english. today there's low level jobs at fast food restaurants and hospitals but if you want to get a decent job that's challenging and fun you have to be able to use a computer. you have to speak in english. all these manuals are all in -- they're not in creole, they're not in portuguese, they're not in spanish. they're in english. so today being a dropout is a tragedy. it shouldn't be happening. >> rose: once you lose a step, you lose a second step and third step and fourth step. >> and literacy. there's an amazing correlation, the couple million people in prison, 85% of them are illiterate. not their fault. >> rose: here's the thing for me. the people -- you and so many people i know-- some deceased, some in youth, some -- but all passionate about education, passionate all have resources, all have a voice. why aren't we fixing this? >> i think fi
combined the latest breakthroughs in science straight from leading research centers with wisdom from the ages. >> knowing what you're really hungry for is the key to losing weight, enjoying more vitality and feeling more joy. >> announcer: join dr. deepak chopra and learn how to permanently lose weight, gain emotional well-being, and reduce the risks of dreaded
of the students. >> he was teaching spirit ofrec. studyinstudying history, studyig science. studying everything but what we were supposed to equip ourselves, to prepare ourselves for new south africa. >> mandela's sentence releasedht of apartheid put his spirit was felt throughout the townships of south africa, control of a black population that refused to be silenced. in 1985 i made my first trip to the land of mandela's birth to find out what was driving the country's people, black and white and also to determine how much of mandela's spirit was still alive. >> what are you singing about?t? what is the song about? >> mandela, mandela.singing. >> mandela and -- ambe batambo. >> and -- >> and exact,. >> there's one man you allrespe. none other than nelson mandela, if and only if that man can be released, he can see the direction of south africa. >> in those otherwise dark dayse horizon. as pressure at home and abroad mounted on the regime. the apartheid system was, mandela, began secret negotiations with the government that would eventually lead to releasing of several prisoners, the south afri
the sport they began understanding -- >> rose: peter did? >> peter morgan as sort of the science of the overtake in formula one which is different than nascar. it's something you have to wait for. >> rose: how do you get around the car. >> right. and he tried to define their lives. he didn't just interview some people and throw the facts together, he was able to design a narrative that is a serious overtaking. i think it's another thing that really surprises audience is that, you know, you never quite see what's coming next. >> rose: what's amazing to me also is here is a guy who can calculate, lauda. he took a risk and he said he wanted to get out of a race because he thought the risk was too great. too damn high to continue so he pulls out. >> well, again, he was a -- he always thought, i think in the long term and a great overview and hunt was forever in the moment, whether he was on the track, whether he was in a club, whether he was home, wherever he was, very gifted man and, as i said, both entirely authentic. >> rose: so niki lauda realizes he's beginning to find some comf
provided by: >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was touted as the biggest day of the year for online shopping, as hundreds of retailers tried to lure millions of holiday shoppers on cyber monday. early numbers suggested a sharp increase over last year, after a four-day holiday weekend that turned out to be disappointing. in a few minutes, we'll take a deeper look at the numbers and retailers' prospects. the u.s. supreme court declined today to decide whether big online retailers have to collect state sales taxes. the justices turned away appeals from amazon and overstock.com after they lost a case in new york state. in the absence of a national ruling, more states may try to tax sales on the internet. a new york commuter tr
previously thought. read about that on our science page. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. >> ifill: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. on thursday, fast-food workers plan strikes in 100 cities across the country to protest low-wages. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and again here tomorrow evening. for all of us here at the "pbs newshour," thank you and good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> this is bbc world news america. funding of this
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)